Member Tips

Please note: You may only publish Member Tips that do not relate to your own business!

Filter results

Click on the white dot of any category that you would like to view

Click to arrange alphabetically or by the most recent

Book: A Love of Eating: Recipes from Tart London

Genevieve Delacroix

This is the recipe book for a weeknight one-pot wonder that can bubble away while you get on with a glass of wine or a showstopper brunch. Try spiced Goan baked eggs or broccoli and taleggio flatbreads. This book is about Tart’s approach to cooking – creating colourful, fresh and wholesome meals.

Visit website

Rutland Charcuterie Company: Biltong

Genevieve Delacroix

The 2018 snack of choice. People are ditching crisps and biscuits in favour of cured meat that is high in protein, generally low in sugar, and bursting with flavour. The snacking salamis made by the Rutland Charcuterie Company offer air-dried meat galore. 

Visit website

Your local supermarket: Clarence Court Eggs

Ruby Scott

Part of Clarence Court’s success is that even a premium hen’s egg is an affordable luxury. The website boasts that these birds are never rushed, leading to their own beautifully distinctive, richer eggs. They describe themselves as a ‘traditionally produced’ comfort food. 

Visit website

London and Oxford: The Wolesley and Café Wolseley

Ruby Scott

Known for its history as a prestigious car showroom, The Wolseley is also the home of afternoon tea. And a café offshoot is coming to Bicester Village, the designer-labels outlet in Oxfordshire. Salad and a glass of wine, or cake and a pot of tea – the same service and twinkle can be expected.

Visit website

Online: Lelli Kelly shoes

Nigel Summerley

These shoes are any young girl’s dream. They would certainly have been mine. Rainbow, glitter, laden with beads… aching with youthful glamour. Head to the ‘Party shoes’ or ‘California bling’ realms of the website for true inspiration. A surefire way to be grandparent of the year.
Visit website

London: Mercato Metropolitano, Elephant and Castle

Genevieve Delacroix

A 45,000 sq ft market space offering a mixture of Italian and London-based artisan producers, including ‘the best pizza maker’ from Naples, supposedly. There’s also Indian tapas and all sorts. The Italian deli is fantastic. 

Visit website

London: The Quality Chop House, Clerkenwell

Ruby Scott

A 19th-century working man’s eating house revamped as a modern British dining room and wine bar. It’s classics-with-a-twist cooking and superb wines. As appealing from the inside, as it is from the out, with wood panels and a cheqeured floor.

Visit website

London: The George Inn, Borough

Ruby Scott

A National Trust-owned pub. It’s an authentic 17th-century coaching inn that was established in the medieval period. The last remaining galleried inn in London, whichCharles Dickens would visit. Now serving ice-cold ales.

Visit website

London: The Churchill Arms, Kensington Church Street

Ruby Scott

A tavern for the floral among us. Visit in the summer when flowers and hedgerow sprout from the windows, roof – all angles. Or visit at Christmas time when it’s bedecked with fir trees. A real crowd-pleaser. Funnily, it’s also a Thai restaurant. Don’t let that put you off.

Visit website

Read: The Secret Life of Cows by Rosamund Young

John Riley-Smith

This book is praised by all who read it, and it has been much celebrated – it was a Times book of the year in 2017. The premise of the book is that cows are as varied as people. They can be highly intelligent, slow to understand, vain… a charming and startling read.

Visit website

Listen: 'Gastropod' podcast

Hamish Charlton

India Knight described this as a ‘fantastically interesting, serious podcast about food, history and science’. Episodes have titles such as the ‘Secrets of Sourdough’, ‘Meet Saffron, the World’s Most Expensive Spice’ and ‘Green Gold: Our Love Affair with Olive Oil’.

Visit website

London: Rules, Mayfair

Genevieve Delacroix

Dating from 1798, and described by Marina O’Loughlin as almost literally ‘the granddaddy of them all’, this is said to be the oldest restaurant in London. She goes on to call it ‘a gilded and velvet-lined temple of game pies’. Which, if that’s your thing, sounds quite heavenly.

Visit website

Edinburgh: Café Marlayne, Thistle Street

Hamish Charlton

This small, French bistro is tucked away on Thistle Street, not far from the hubbub of the Royal Mile. There's the regular menu as well as the blackboarded extras. Lovely, cosy atmosphere and a delightful selection of aperitifs – from kir royale to a hearty G&T.

Visit website

WEST YORKSHIRE: The Moorcock Inn, Sowerby Bridge

Ruby Scott

This little-known gem was recently reviewed by ST restaurant critic Marina O’Loughlin & she raved about the set menu – 'everyone gets the same exhilarating dishes'. Very happily, there is nothing 'new romanticist' about the cooking. She describes it as ‘like a pub with ales & scotch eggs & locals’.

LIVERPOOL: Life in Motion: Egon Schiele and Francesca Woodman at Tate Liverpool, Merseyside

Gary Ley

Waldemar Januszczak says that 'of all the galleries in the Tate empire, this is the one that's the most comfortable in its own skin'. What a compliment – and now it has this blockbuster exhibition, an inventive pairing of Schiele & Woodman. It's packed with glamour, law-breaking, but also tragedy. 

Visit website

online: amelia rope chocolate

Ferdie Rous

My favourite chocolate by far. I can’t resist chocolate-dipped rose petals, pansies, violas and mint leaves.

Visit website

London: St John, Smithfield

James Pembroke

St John stays nonchalantly truer than ever to its creed of eating all the bits we’ve neglected since the end of rationing. Even A A Gill, after earlier ridiculing what he took to be affectation, willingly ate humble pie by the shovel when he confessed time and time again that Fergus was the master.

Visit website

East Yorkshire: the lighthouse museum, withnersea

John Bowling

Head to the Lighthouse Museum with its permanent Kay Kendall display. Kendall was the star of the original road movie Genevieve (1953) and the short-lived wife of Rex Harrison, her co-star in The Constant Husband. 

Visit website

DENMARK: louisiana museum of modern art, Copenhagen

John Bowling

The Louisiana Museum of Modern Art is an art museum located on the shore of the Øresund Sound in Humlebæk, 35 km (22 miles) north of Copenhagen, Denmark. The most visited art museum in Denmark, it has an extensive permanent collection of modern and contemporary art.

Visit website

Cumbria: Howtown Hotel

Genevieve Delacroix

I adore this place, set back from the shores of the Ullswater and set back in time. Jacqui Baldry has run Howtown for more than half a century. She’s never had a computer; when you telephone for a room, you are asked to confirm in writing; she then acknowledges by hand. 

Visit website

Cornwall: barbara hepworth museum and sculpture garden, St Ives

London Potters

Hepworth lived here for 26 years, from 1949 until her death in 1975 in a fire on the premises, sparked by one of her own cigarettes. A great insight into where the sculptor lived and worked, and where she is now commemorated through her famous bronzes. 

Visit website

‘a life of my own’ by claire tomalin

Annabel Sampson

I listened to Claire Tomalin, the celebrated biographer’s, autobiography. From her younger years, being a student at Oxford to life on the literary front-line of the New Statesman and life-shattering horrors like the death of her husband. I had no idea she’d gone through so much! 

Visit website

YORKSHIRE: Kay Latto Sculpture, Ripon

Alfred Watchley

Kay’s principal inspiration is the infinitely varied human head. Her contemporary work is inspired by classical art, and her most recent ‘brick works’ explore construction, deconstruction and the space between. She is available for commissions – be that a head or a fountain, get in touch to discuss your sculptural requirement.
Visit website

Yorkshire: bils & rye pottery, formerly nunnington studios

Lucy Blanchette

Bils & Rye is tucked behind beautiful Yorkshire country house, Nunnington Hall. It's perched on the banks of the river rye (a very unpretentious art location) that sells a diverse range of beautiful ceramics – some of which look like prehistoric objects from dug up from the bottom of the sea.

Visit website

Yorkshire Dales: a walk in muker, swaledale

Charles Fergusson

The Yorkshire Dales at its most quaint and picturesque. Muker is a village and civil parish at the western end of Swaledale, complete with tea rooms and a pub. Muker village is the heart for a multitude of Yorkshire walks that combine great scenery, wild swimming, wildlife, flowers and waterfalls. 

Visit website
< Previous | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 | Next >