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London: Twelfth Night at The Young Vic

Lysander Tyler-Green

A modernised and upbeat musical re-imaginiation of this classic. Of course, any kind of change to such a classic will upset one group or other, but it just might keep the younger generation interested in the Bard.

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‘Peterloo: The Story of the Manchester Massacre’

Hamish Charlton

A fascinating account of a dark and occasionally overlooked chapter in British history. Riding describes in vivid detail the years of, to put it mildly, economic hardships that led to this tragedy.

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Hive.co.uk

Arthur Nottle

A high street-friendly alternative to Amazon, a percentage of every sale goes to a local bookshop of your choosing. They are a little slower, and a little pricier, but it has as much charm as can be expected of an online book retailer.

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London: The Perseverance pub

Trevor Littleboy

The cornerstone of trendy Lambs Conduit Street in Bloomsbury, this Victorian era pub offers locally brewed ale, as well as some of the best pizzas available in the area. A particular highlight is the weekly pub quiz on Monday nights.

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London: Bloomsbury Festival

Charles Fergusson

The annual festival kicks off on 17th October this year, and if it lives up to previous years, promises to provide a showcase of the cultural core of Bloomsbury, with events taking place in the many squares, universities, and quirky side streets found in the area.

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Television: Hard Sun

Charles Fergusson

A bloated police procedural/hard sci-fi hybrid that takes itself too seriously. It is presented with an edge that it can’t seem to sharpen, and offers no respite from its ever darkening plot. Pre-apocalyptic fiction is rarely attempted, and this would be a prime example as to why. 

'The Fall of Gondolin' by J.R.R. Tolkien

Charles Fergusson

It is a remarkable achievement that Tolkien’s legendarium is showing no signs of slowing it’s continual expansion, even some 45 after his death. This latest instalment goes back to a more traditional approach to storytelling, but loses none of the epic scale that is expected.

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Audible

Harold Llwelyn

Audiobooks are nothing new, but the ability to carry a library’s worth on your phone is. An Audible subscription through Amazon costs £7.99 and provides one audiobook per month (you can of course purchase more at a higher rate) and has turned my commute into something to look forward to.

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London: Society of Marine Artists Annual 2018

Ruby Scott

The annual exhibition of the best that the Society of Marine Artists returns for its 2018 exhibition at Mall Galleries. Entry is a nominal fee considering the quality, but free entry is granted to those with a copy of the September Oldie.

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London: Oslo Court

Margot Petherick

Tucked away underneath an assuming block of flats in North London is this treasure of a restaurant. Eternally stuck in the mid 1970s, the interior is a sea of muted pinks. However, it most closely resembles the 1970s with it’s size and options for lunch and dinner. Definitely worth a try.

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Oxford: Tolkien: Maker of Middle-Earth

Margot Petherick

Moving to New York at the end of the month, this is the definitive showcase of J.R.R. Tolkien’s life and art. Naturally focusing on his magnum opus, The Lord of the Rings, and accompanying works, this is worth a visit even for the most casual of fans.

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London: Persephone Books

Alfred Watchley

Situated on Lambs Conduit Street, this bookshop and publishing house offers up somewhat of a niche: republishing out of print female authors, with a focus on the 20th century. There are more than a few hidden gems to be found here, with some top class assistance from the staff.

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London: The Lady Ottoline pub

Alfred Watchley

A recently refurbished gem off the beaten track in literary Bloomsbury. Just a stones throw away from the Charles Dickens Museum, this pub offers up a generous selection of libations, and thoroughly English fare that is a cut above the usual gastropub offerings.

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Cambridge: 'The Tickell Arms', Whittlesford

Edith Warren

A bright blue pub! Determined to keep the local pub alive, four local real ales are served and a hearty wine list. The restaurant serves seasonal British food and is the perfect spot for any season. A garden room overlooks the pond (great for summer) and real fires make it a good wintery place too.

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London: The Vault at the 'Hard Rock Café', Park Lane

Coralie Purves

Fans of music memorabilia will appreciate 'The Vault'. So named because the space was once part of a Coutts bank and now holds valuable music mementos. The collection includes the guitar used by Guns N’ Roses guitarist 'Slash' in the November Rain video and a harpsichord often used by The Beatles.

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Suffolk: 'Bawdsey Radar' Museum, Bawdsey

Edith Warren

Tells the story of the 'Invention that Changed the World'. It reveals how scientists & engineers came together (1930s) to prove that radio waves could locate aeroplanes, ships & other targets. It's the world's first operational radar station & played a pivotal role in the Battle of Britain in 1940.

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Suffolk: 'Marlesford Mill' antiques, Woodbridge

Thea Dale

A vast treasure-trove spread over three floors where more than thirty independent retailers specialise in a wide variety of bits 'n' bobs: fine art to pictures;furniture to objects; soft furnishings to garden furniture - not forgetting vinyl, record players & vintage clothes.

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South West France: 'Boutique Chateau de Lartigolle', Pessan

Edith Warren

Bespoke 'boutique' chateau that accommodates up to twenty-eight guests across twelve en-suite bedrooms. Plenty of space – both in and outdoors – with beautifully decorated interiors. The chateau offeres a tailored planning service so you won't need to do a thing. A truly specatcular place to visit.

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Aldeburgh: 'The Regatta' restaurant

Thea Dale

Robert and Johanna Mabey have owned and run 'Regatta' for twenty years. Robert is also head chef and trained at the Connaught Hotel and La Gavroche before heading back to his roots in East Anglia. The menu is varied but all year round, the emphasis is on locally caught fish and seafood.

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Hastings: 'Maggie's Fish and Chips', Fisherman's Beach

Thea Dale

Into its third decade of serving hearty portions of the freshest fish, cooked to order, in their cheery cafe. It's the same traditional approach as when Margaret Banfield first put her name above the door. It's on the Fisherman's Beach - so you'll be able to enjoy some cracking views as well.

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Travel on 'The North Norfolk Railway'

Thea Dale

'The North Norfolk Railway' offers a 10.5 mile round trip by steam train through a delightful area of North Norfolk designated as being of outstanding natural beauty. To the south are wooded hills and the Norfolk beauty spots of Kelling Heath and Sheringham Park. To the north, the sea!

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Leeds: 'Whitelocks’s Ale House', Turk's Head Yard

Jonathan Finchley

Built in 1715, and with its current famous interior dating from the late 1800s, Whitelock’s is the oldest public house in Leeds. Preserving the rich history and charm that has always been the cornerstone of Whitelock’s, while infusing it with new life. Offer a wide selection of ale and craft beers.

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North Tyneside: 'The Spanish City', Whitley Bay

Edith Warren

A smaller version of Blackpool's Pleasure Beach that opened in 1910 as a concert hall, restaurant and tearoom. Located near the seafront, with its Renaissance-style frontage it has became known for the distinctive dome. It's now a Grade II listed building and you can eat, drink or get married there.

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London: 'Dinings' sushi restaurant, Marylebone

Annabel Sampson

Once one of Marylebone’s best-kept secrets now has a reputation larger than its compact, converted-townhouse setting. Getting a table in the basement is unlikely without a booking, but if you’re lucky there may be a spare stool at the street-level sushi counter. The food is indisputably excellent.

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Gloucestershire: 'Hidcote Manor Garden', Chipping Campden

Thea Dale

One of the most influential Arts and Crafts gardens in Britain, with its linked ‘rooms' of hedges, rare trees, shrubs and herbaceous borders. Created by Lawrence Johnston, it is owned by the National Trust and open to the public. Be sure to visit.

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