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The Green Roasting Tin: Vegan and Vegetarian One Dish Dinners by Rukmini Iyer

Jonathan Finchley

Greydar has formerly endorsed the meaty Roasting Tin. Now for the veggie sibling! Seventy-five one-tin recipes for everyone from flexitarians to families – fuss-free colourful cooking.

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Twist Teas

Coralie Purves

Behind the scenes at Greydar we’ve tried all the showy brands teas. But, in all seriousness, none are as good as Twist Teas. Its tastiest flavours are startlingly enjoyable. Mint choc chip? A blend of black tea, peppermint and cocoa. Don’t turn your nose up at Banana Shake or Sherbet Pip,either.

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Art and Ideas podcast: Radio 3

Lucy Blanchette

Considered a rival to Radio 4’s stalwart Desert Island Discs and the lesser-known Inheritance Tracks, this is the show where guests from all walks of life discuss their musical loves and hates, and talk about the influence music has had on their lives.

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Michael Jackson at the National Portrait Gallery (Until 21st October 2018)

Ruby Scott

The new exhibition reveals how the King of Pop fascinated visual artists around the world – more than fifty of them to be precise. On display are kitsch photographs by David LaChapelle, iconic lithograph prints by Andy Warhol, and his distinctive mug pasted on to Grayson Perry’s ceramics.

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Edward Bawden at Dulwich Picture Gallery (23rd May - 9th September 2018)

Margot Petherick

‘If your eyes aren’t what they were, bring a magnifying glass to Edward Bawden, at Dulwich Picture Gallery. You don’t want to miss an inch of this marvellous, mischievous exhibition,’ says Laura Freeman. It’s been a bumper year for Bawden and this exhibition brims with eccentric British brilliance.

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Dame Lucie Rie: Ceramics and Buttons at York City Art Gallery (22 June 2018 – 12 May 2019)

Sally Longville

This new exhibition includes more than 30 works by Lucy Rie. Rie is one of the most respected potters of the 20th century, world-renowned for her finely thrown and beautifully decorated functional domestic ceramics. This exhibition will reveal hundreds of her never-seen-before handmade buttons.

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Devon: Yeotown rural getaway, Snapper

Lara Akeroyd

This contemporary hideaway in lush north Devon countryside is a great place to get into yoga. Book onto the weekly, four-night Yeotox health and fitness programme and you can also enjoy astonishingly good vegetarian food, strong massage, hikes, surfing and coasteering. 

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Gran Luchito Chipotle Chilli Mayo

Edith Warren

Mayonnaise has long been styled on its simplicity. But change is afoot. This chipotle mayonnaise is a smoky-hot twist on the classic. In Mexico, it’s often dolloped onto tuna tostada or spread over whole grilled corn on the cob topped with grated cheese and a squeeze of lime.

Figs for breakfast

Thea Dale

Far superior in summer to their breakfast rival – the avocado. July is the time to change your breakfast routine with plump in-season figs – slice onto toast that’s been swished with ricotta and drizzle with honey. Tatins, cakes, salads, yoghurty puds, preserves... figs can be enjoyed all day long.

Online: Nigella Lawson on Instagram

Genevieve Delacroix

The joy of Nigella’s Instagram feed is not her recipes: there are brilliant tips on where to eat and people to find out about, plus her choice of the cookbooks that really resonate with her. Twenty years after the seminal How to Eat, Nigella is as vital as ever to anyone with a good appetite.

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Le Creuset: Casserole dish in new shades

Mary Canon-Belle

‘It’s a dangerous habit to form, but when Le Creuset brings out a new colour like Rosemary, suddenly it’s time to update’ claims Lisa Markwell, editor of the Dish. This shallow casserole dish is perfect for shakshuka (a rich tomato-and-spice stew topped with eggs and herbs, matching the pot).

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Buy a Chicken Guard

Charles Fergusson

This is an automatic chicken coop door opener – designed to save your beloved hens from wily predators. ‘No more early starts, and no more sleepless nights’ is what the website brags. The website is worth a gander: helpful videos, interesting links… a corner of the web for poultry enthusiasts.

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North Yorkshire: Boggle Hole, Whitby

Trevor Littleboy

When Robin Hood’s Bay is gridlocked, head a mile south down the coastal path to Boggle Hole. Keep an eye out for fossilised ammonites fallen from the cliffs. There’s a grassy spur here called the Nab, and if you get the suntrap scoop on its south side, you’ve got the best place on the beach.

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East Yorksire: Filey Beach, Filey

Arthur Nottle

This beach is beautifully understated. Visit on a summery afternoon, and you might catch the roke – a sea mist round these parts – lurking offshore. Wildly optimistic surfers may very likely be bobbing around on the millpond sea beneath screeching flocks of guillemots and indignant oystercatchers.

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North Devon: Bucks Mills beach, Clovelly

Harold Llwelyn

This is where the blue ocean, sea-scoured rocks and jungle-covered cliffs — complete with waterfall — combine to create the type of beauty we board flights to see. Situated in a rocky cove at the bottom end of the ancient fishing village, it has been described as being ‘trapped in a bygone age’.

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Northumberland: Embleton Bay, to the east of the village of Embleton

Hamish Charlton

A sunny Saturday would be well spent in Embleton Bay, sitting beneath the ruins of Dunstanburgh Castle, eating crab sandwiches and watching newly arrived squadrons of swallows swooping over the rocks. The glorious coastline makes for some excellent walks.

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London: Tate Britain, Jazz Brunch at the Rex Whistler restaurant

Alfred Watchley

From 12 noon Tate Britain’s live jazz trios will transport brunch guests to the hot jazz, blues and popular tunes of the 1920s and 1930s. Delicious seasonal dishes served alongside classic brunch dishes and cocktails of the time. Join for music only, or music and a bloody Mary, or music and brunch.

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Ikea: Rattan Garden Furniture

Rich Davey

Affordable garden furniture… Brighten up your garden or indoor space with Ikea’s range of rattan and plastic rattan garden furniture. Whether you’re looking to revitalise your conservatory or make your patio beautiful, there is a selection of excellent rattan tables, chairs or sofas.

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Botanical Posters from The Print Florist

Jonathan Finchley

Contemporary floral prints that feel a touch art deco and wouldn’t look out of place in Charles Rennie Mackintosh surrounds. Have your print personalised and look at the website for ideas.

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The Sea, The Sea by Iris Murdoch

Lucy Blanchette

The book that finally won Iris Murdoch a Booker is as ludicrous as it is brilliant. It was Iris Murdoch's nineteenth novel, and it was her fourth to make the Booker shortlist.

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The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy

Ruby Scott

The literary sensation of the 1990s and one of the most popular Booker Prize winners ever. The hype is justified: this tale of twins growing up amid political turbulence in Kerala is captivating.

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London: South London Gallery, Camberwell (20th September)

Margot Petherick

The South London Gallery (SLG) soon opens its new annexe in the former Peckham Road Fire Station, across the road from the main gallery site. As the earliest surviving purpose-built fire station in London, the annexe includes exhibition and education spaces, an artists’ studio and communal kitchen.

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Rites of Passage by William Golding

Sally Longville

In this complex dissection of society, a priest suffers after an ill-advised drunken escapade on a ship bound for Australia in the 19th century. A former Booker Prize winner.

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A Life of My Own by Claire Tomalin

Lara Akeroyd

In this triumph of clear-sightedness, Tomalin turns her biographer’s searchlight on herself. Alongside the path of her dazzling career (as a literary editor, and biographer of Dickens, Hardy, Pepys and Austen) is an unflinching account of a life touched by tragedy, delivered with zero self-pity. 

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The Vanity Fair Diaries 1983-1992 by Tina Brown

Edith Warren

In the Times, Lynn Barber writes that, ‘Brown says she originally planned to write a book about the Crazy Eighties but, when she looked back at her diaries, she realised she had already written it’. As editor of Vanity Fair in New York, she was almost the personification of the Crazy Eighties.

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